Interior of the church de la Sainte-Trinité of Morsan

Weeks after July 14 I finally have enough time to sort the photos.

About the church: It was built in the 13th century, only parts of the nave and one of the windows have been preserved. The rest was rebuilt in the 17th century. The choir was added and bigger windows were inserted. In the church are several objects, that are classified “Monuments historiques” (historical monuments).

A big retable built in the second half of the 17th century with corinthian columns and a tabernacle. On the right side is a sculptur of angels, including Gabriel. On the left side is a statue of Germanus of Auxerre. In the middle is a painting of the 19th century, that’s depicting the holy family. Own photo on Wikimedia commons, licence: CC by SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Germanus of Auxerre, Saint Germain. Under him the coat of arms of the family Le Sens de Morsan. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

An eagle-lectern, that was built at the end of the 17th century in the style of Louis-quatorze. Own photo on Wikimedia commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Eagle-lectern. Own photo on Wikimedia commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Left side of the gavre of the family Le Sens de Morsan. Shouldn’t it be “du” Sens? I don’t think the inscription was painted in the 17th century. Own photo on Wikimedia commons, licence: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

And it’s also strange, that they are named Comtes de Sens here, I thought that was the other branch, the le Sens de Folleville. The coat of arms with the three incense burners is very nice. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

1600… somehow I guess this date was only written there because it looks good. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Morsan used to be a parish and it had its own Confrérie de Charité (brotherhood of charity), a catholic group of laymen, who organized funerals for a small or no fee, depending on the wealth of the deceased. Nowadays Morsan belongs to the parish of Montfort-sur-Risle and to the Confrérie de Charité of Giverville.

This religious standard of the Confrérie de charite of Morsan was made in the 19th century. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Religious standard, stars and clothing are embroidered, face and hands are painted and sewed on the fabric. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Church window and candlesticks which were used for processions. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Decorated candlestick. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Choir stalls. To support old, sick and/or weak people while standing. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Side altar. Own photo, licence:: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

On both sides of the pulpit are traces of the litre seigneuriale. This litre seigneuriale or litre funéraire was a black band inside or outside of churches on which the nobility, that owned a parish, painted their coat of arms, if someone died. This memorial stayed in the beginning only for one year but towards the end of the ancien régime it was often kept. In the French Revolution those memorial bands were covered with paint or plaster. The town council of Morsan decided to try to recover this memorial band until September 15, the European Heritage Days.

Pulpit. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Here you can see, that there is something black under the paint, we hope that there is also a coat of arms somewhere. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Confessional, baptismal font and stoup all in one corner. The church is rather small and on July 14 every of the provisorial seats was occupied. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Further Reading

Morsan on the site of the village association (french)

Morsan in the Base Palissy of the Ministère de la Culture (french)

Creative Commons License
Interior of the church de la Sainte-Trinité of Morsan by stanze is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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2 thoughts on “Interior of the church de la Sainte-Trinité of Morsan

  1. [...] they don’t open the church de la Trinité in Morsan very often. Good idea to visit it on Heritage [...]

  2. [...] be posted. Since someone asked me about it, thanks for reading my articles Mr S, I start with the church de la sainte Trinité in Morsan on September 16, Sunday of the Heritage Days 2012. On the outside everything was different. The [...]

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