The church in Morsan on Heritage Days 2012

I can only drive the car until the end of the year. That’ll end my motorised photo-tours. At the moment the weather is quite bad, but I’ll certainly take as many photos as possible as long as I can. I had a lot of work on the property and in the castle and therefore I couldn’t post much and there’s a couple of photos waiting to be posted. Since someone asked me about it, thanks for reading my articles Mr S, I start with the church de la sainte Trinité in Morsan on September 16, Sunday of the Heritage Days 2012.

église de la Sainte-Trinité de Morsan

On the outside everything was different. The door was open and bicyles were lying under the huge yew tree. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Before the lecture started, I grabbed the historian and told him about the last Marquis Le Sens of Morsan. About his extravagance and his parties. I didn’t want to listen to the sad and untrue story of the evil Germans that ruined him 1870 in the Franco-Prussian War. He lived until the 1930s. The historian accepted what I told him and quoted me later. During his speech he must have quoted several of the women around, he was looking at us, when he was reflecting our knowledge.

Carrying a not very historic bench outside. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The historian in the sanctuary in front of the 17th century altar. Own photo, licence: © stanzebla (stanzebla.wordpress.com). All rights reserved.

The whole village was there, and above that Pierre Roussel, der head of the AMSE (Association of Friends of the Monuments and Sights in Eure), several members of that association, the mayor and an artist who has a gallery in Saint-Georges-du-Vièvre.

This time I managed to take a photo of one of the listed 18th century cantor-stools. There are only two of the 5 stools left. The others had been taken by the government. They were supposed to get restored, but never came back. They are somewhere, but nobody knows where.

Cantor-stool. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC 0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The 17th century high altar is very impressive. François Le Sens donated him to the church on the occasion of his marriage. And he made similar donations in favour of the church of Notre-Dame-d’Épine. The altarpiece was added in the 19th century, it was a gift of Napoleon III (1808-1873). The historian looked at the mayor and said it would be thrilling to find out what is under this painting, maybe an older and more avluable one (that’s what they always hope). When the village has enough money, they’ll examine the painting.

The high altar with the altarpiece. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

After the Council of Trent (1545-1563) the interior of the churches was changed as a result of the Counter-Reformation. The interior of the churches was now supposed to improve the evangelization by means of better knowledge of the Roman-catholic creeds. Baptisms and confessions were only allowed in the nave, which represented the aspect of penance. The choir represented the triumph of the church, the heaven. That’s why the altar is highly decorated with statues of saints and angels. On top it shows the Trinity. Originally it was painted very colourful. Today the wood is painted like grey marble.

The church tabernacle. These two angels were originally carrying a crown. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Die Seitenaltäre wurden zusammen mit dem Hauptaltar gefertigt.

Baroque angels on a side altar. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Der trabes doxalis (joist of glory, poutre de gloire) is made of wood, but it looks as if it was metal. It can’t carry the weight of the triumphal cross. The cross is attached to the church vault.

Joist of glory and triumphal cross. own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The coat of arms of the Le Sens of Morsan shows three frankincense burners, because the French word for frankincense is l’encens and the pronunciation of l’encens is about the same as the pronunciation of Le Sens. All French words sound alike. Coats of arms are never very funny.

The coats of arms of the Le Sens of Morsan. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

An exceptional find are several handstitched 19th century sashes of the Confrérie de charité (brotherhood of charity) of Morsan. They show naïve motifs. In the 19th century sashes of this kind were usually manufactured. These sashes are not listed yet, but it is likely, that they will be listed soon.

Handstitched sash. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Sash of 1834. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Mortcloth of 1908. Own photo, licence: C0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The vestments of the priests were made of the old dresses of the Marquise. That’s why many of them are very colourful and show flower motifs. The original free standing altar was destroyed during the French Revolution (1789-1799). There was never made a new one. The priest uses a provisorial altar today. It is covered with old vestments.

The free standing altar. Own photo, licence: C0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The dresses of the Marquise turned into flowery vestments. 18th century? Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Altar bells. Own photo, licence: C0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The litre seigneuriale (band of mourning) is not fully recovered yet, but on two places the coat of arms of the Le Sens gleams through the paint.

The red tincture of the field of the coats of arms of the Le Sens under the paint. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

The 19th century windows sadly aren’t as tasteful as the altars.

Pietà. Mary’s heart pierced by seven daggers. 19th century window. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

Annunciation. Own photo, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

No idea what this depicts. Maybe it’s better not to know. Own photo, licence: C0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain Dedication

After the lecture we met outside on the unhistorical benches and talked a bit. Monsieur C. was making jokes. “Facebook? Yes, I got Facebook, face of a buck.” The pronunciation of book and buck is the same in French. Then we went on to other monuments.

13th century window on the westside. Own photo, licence: CC by SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported


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2 thoughts on “The church in Morsan on Heritage Days 2012

  1. Oh what a magnificent church! You’re a true historian. What a great story. Now I’m really eager to return to Morsan. So why can you only drive until the end of the year?

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