Tidy dead-end streets in le Theil-Nolent

Me and Rudi went to Le Theil-Nolent on September 9, a hot and sunny day. Le Theil-Nolent had 221 inhabitants in 2009. It is a village in the canton of Thiberville. Last year its mayor, Michel Millard de Montrion, most likely a member of a more or less noble family, visited us and complained a lot about our village. No idea what his problem was, he liked neither the castle nor the rest of the village.

City limit sign on the southern side of Le Theil-Nolent. The village is part of the Remembrance Way because it lies at the former RN13, the road over which the Canadian Army came in 1944 to free the north of Eure. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

I entered the municipal territory from the north and immediately lost the way. The village seems to consist of dead-end streets, tidy dead-end streets. I stopped at a lavoir with some benches and a table for a picnic. lavoirs at small ponds make we wonder, how the people are supposed to clean their clothes in the standing water. Nowadays those lavoirs are often used by (optimistic) fishermen. I stared at my maps to find out where the heck I was. Somewhere in a web ob dead-ends north of the town centre.

The lavoir. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

I went south past some dead-end streets, left the village in the south, re-entered it, went east and finally found the town hall.

Rudi in front of the town hall. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Everything was very tidy, except maybe the adjustment of the poles on the parking place, and an exemplary disabled parking spot. There’s only one house in the vicinity though, all the other people seem to live in the dead-end streets.

It was a hot day. We had some water and a bowl in the car. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Opposite the town hall, at the other end of a vast place, stands the church Sainte-Colombe with the inevitable war memorial.

War memorial. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The church is very nice, it was built in the 16th century and enlarged in the 18th century. Patron saint is Columba of Sens. The village belonged to Bec Abbey from 1065 until the French Revolution (1789-1799). Since the 17th century the village had a second seigneur, the family Coudray. They built a manor house, which I couldn’t find. Sigh. The above mentioned mayor owns a 19th century castle, which I couldn’t find either.

The church Sainte-Colombe. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Southern side of the church. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The timber-framed parts of the façade are decorated with patterns of black silex and flat bricks. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

In the shadow of the wall around the cemetery stood a cute horse. It was really a hot day.

This house is already tanned. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

And Charolais-cattle in the background. They were probably just getting a sunstroke. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

I followed one of the marked hiking trails north. There was a statue next to the road. That statue of the saint Colomba was created in 1997 and because of the lack of freedom of panorama (FOP) in France, I can’t upload photos of it. Behind the statue starts a grove with muddy, rectangular basins that were probably once used to breed fishes. This grove was dark and not tidy at all. On the path I found feathers and other rests of a dead bird. That made me think of traps. There are often traps to catch foxes in the woods around here. I went back. At the road a couple of Charolais looked at me rather reproachful. It was time to get out of Le Theil-Nolent.

The grove. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

I guess these muddy basins are full of cheekily tourists, that threw candy wrappers on the main street. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

These cows and calves don’t seem to be amused. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Further Reading

Bienvenue sur le site du Theil-Nolent (french)

Creative Commons License
Tidy dead-end streets in le Theil-Nolent by stanzebla is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

2 thoughts on “Tidy dead-end streets in le Theil-Nolent

    • Hmm. I thought it’s a bit too clean. Look at the photo with the cows, the fence posts in the background seem to have the same distance. Where’s the usual rebellious attitude? Maybe it’s French before the Revolution? Louis XIV French?

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