We don’t like winter

Sorry for my absence. I’ve got (still) “some” work in the park to do and got to adapt to the change of daylight. Plus: it’s very cold at the computer, that stands in the corner of the living room. It’s okay in the evening when I got a fire in the wood stove, but at the moment there are only 14°C (57.2 °F) at the computer, which is too cold to write or do anything else. My feet stick in an electrical heating thingy and I wear loads of clothes, just like an onion.

In case you wonder… it’s the same procedure every year. No central heating and – what’s more crucial – no insulation at all do that to this little servant of certain Americans, cats and sheep (me). I can’t wear gloves while typing. A heated keyboard would be great.

The sheep complained today as well. We have snow. It fell with 60km/h (37.28 mph). The sheep got a special breakfast to make up for the weather: hay, dried sheepfood and beets. Rudi refused to go out. He’s lying in front of the paraffin heater. Farbexplosion (cat) refused to go out as well. But she forgot every ten minutes why and asked me to change the weather. I carried her finally outside and left her there. How cruel of me. Ten minutes later she wanted to come back in, but I was not allowed to carry her and at first she refused to jump into the window of “her” room. If I could change the weather, it would always be mild and sunny. I might live in the 19th century, but I’m not a country parson.

Therefore I’ll post some photos of better days. Sunny October for example.

Brad, Rudi and a female lamb in sunny October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Brad, Rudi and a female lamb in sunny October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Sheep chat in the evening sun in October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Sheep chat in the evening sun in October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

CC by-SA/ Creative Sun, a green pasturage, minerals and a well filled hay-barn. Own photo, licence: Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

CC by-SA/ Creative Sun, a green pasturage, minerals and a well filled hay-barn. Own photo, licence: Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

But some sheep still complain. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

But some sheep still complain. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Stirnlöckchen

Stirnlöckchen felt very bad in November and I already thought it was time to call the vet and put her down. The English worker complained about her state too. Oh well, we don’t euthanise people either. And I really wait until the day it’s necessary because the animal suffers. She has rheumatism and I treated her legs with gel for humans. It worked very well. She feels better again. I would miss her and one of her daughters too. Her daughter is 4 or 5 years old and always waits for Stirnlöckchen. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Little Knubbel, her mother is standing behind the gate. No idea what she's waiting for. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Little Knubbel, her mother is standing behind the gate. No idea what she’s waiting for. The lamb has collected a little branch, probably as some kind of charm. Branches are a girls best friend. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Phex, guarding the castle in October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Phex, guarding the castle in October. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

He looks so good. He was just getting his winter fur. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

He looks so good. He was just getting his winter fur. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Rudi assists Phex. Together it's less boring to guard. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Rudi assists Phex. Together it’s less boring to guard. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

8 thoughts on “We don’t like winter

  1. Feel for you in the cold. Do sheep make good lawn mowers? We have a field I’m fed up cutting but fear they may end up eating all the grapes in the vinyard.

    • Yes, they will eat all grapes and probably make parties there. Wear woolen party hats and invite the sheep of the neighbourhood. No, seriously, they will eat the grapes. But it’s easy to build a fence for sheep, they usually don’t try to jump over fences. I can recommend sheep any time. But you got to take 5 if they aren’t socialised with dogs and humans (means fed with the bottle). Because they don’t feel safe alone.

  2. herrjeh… das glaube ich, dass das kalt ist. wir haben trotz central heating allerdings auch irgendwie “nur” 17grad in unserem appartement
    letzten winter am alten arbeitsort ist bei minus 40 und kälter draussen ds heizsystem eingefrohren und wir hatten nur um die null grad im haus für 4 wochen…. brrrrr

    • Owei das ist ja auch nicht gerade warm. Vielleicht kommt es euch warm vor, wenn ihr reinkommt, aber nach einer Weile wirds nicht mehr so toll sein. Gerade sinds hier in der Ecke 16°C aber am Ofen ist es natürlich wärmer. Ich soll halt im Winter nicht so viel am rechner hocken. Um die 0° im Haus geht doch gar nicht.😮 Da wärt ihr mit Holzofen besser dran gewesen.

  3. Oooo! It’s cold just reading about your daily life. Aren’t cats a wreck. There’s no winning with them.😀 Rudi looks to be enjoying helping Phex work!!!🙂 I’m with you on your sheep. As long as possible as long as she is comfortable.

    • Got to hide this comment from my cats. But yes, this cat can be a bit annoying. And she has a hypnotic voice, if she calls, I just have to obey. *sigh*

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