The rebus of Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre

Deutsche Version: hier.
Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre is a village with 342 inhabitants. It lies a bit north of here, right behind Saint-Victor-d’Épine. (The author waves with her arm in the direction of the colza fields.) I never took photos there, shame on me. If I ever get a car again, I’ll drive there and take photos for sure. The village is best known for a 16th century rebus designed with dark flintstone on the southern façade of the church Saint-Grégoire (Pope Gregory I.).

Edit: in the meantime I drove with one of my villagers (who complained about the pictures in this article) to Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre and we took photos.)

The 16th century rebus. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0 / Creative Commons public domain dedication

Generations of historians and other crazy folks have tried to decipher the rebus. The solution is something like “le monde est corrompu et faux sal” (French, since it’s in France), which means ‘the world is corrupt and deceptive sal’. No idea about “sal”. I’d say it’s the name or the initials of the author.

Arthur Join-Lambert (1839–1917) explains the rebus in the above mentioned book as follows. “Le” (‘the’) is written in normal letters. Then follows a globus cruciger that stands for the world or for the Christian world. Then follows the word “est” (‘is’) in normal letters and a bugle (“cor”) that is interrupted or broken in the middle. “Cor” inter “rupt”.

Grave of Arthur Join-Lambert on the cemetery of Livet-sur-Authou. That’s a bit northeast of here, over a hill in a valley. (The author waves her left arm in direction of the colza fields.) He was one of the locals. A local in a castle, but still a local. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain

Join-Lambert claims that the 16 black and white fields represent the 16th century. ‘The Christian world in the 16th century is corrupt and deceptive sal.’ That would refer to the French Wars of Religion (1562–1598). Strange but true, the little village of Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre was owned by the kings of France from the 14th to the 16th century. Last king who directly owned the village was the huguenot Henry IV of France (1553–1610). He was involved in the wars.

Bigger towns in the vicinity, like Bernay and Pont-Audemer, were attacked in 1590, either by the Catholics or by the Huguenots. (The result is the same, the troops plunder and the inhabitants die.)

The rebus and the knight who chases his horse. Licence: public domain

The 16 fields are followed by the word “et” (‘and’) and a very well designed scythe. The French word for scythe is “faux”. “Faux” is a homonym, it means scythe or wrong (deceptive). And “faux” is one of those words that sound like hundreds of other French words. I don’t understand how French people get along. Okay I am exaggerating a bit. Only a bit. Join-Lambert thought, that it probably means something that sounds alike but is different. For example “faut” 3rd person singular of “falloir”, ‘having to do something’, ‘needing’. At this point I started to worry about Join-Lambert’s mental health. ‘The Christian world in the 16th century is corrupt and (one) has to sal.’? That makes no sense. He must have been drinking laudanum. He continues: “sal” means Israel, the missing letters have been miraculously incorporated in the “A”. Or somewhere else. Enough is enough. No, Join-Lambert, you’re wrong. And it’s not a freemason-inscription either. Early freemasons existed in England, that’s right, but they wouldn’t have made French rebuses.

The knight follows his horse. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons public domain dedication

According to Fulcanelli the ensemble of flintstone figures on the whole church had alchemistic denotation. He starts with the knight who is running after his horse. Horses are fountains in alchemy and the knight is ‘Hermes Trismegistus unveiled’, the inscription is the ‘triumph of Hermes’ and an attack of wolves is the battle of two natures. That would be impressive… if it wasn’t boring.

Attack by wolves, own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative commons public domain dedication

In mediaeval times Vièvre was a forest that covered the area from Saint-Étienne-l’Allier to the river Risle. It had a surface of approximately 50km² (19.31 square miles, 5000 hectars). The forest was full of wild animals, bears, wild boars and wolves. It is far more likely that the artistic mason used the walls of the church as some kind of newspaper, a narrative of events. Something like: King Henry fell off his horse. Wolves attacked villagers or their livestock. Living in times of religious war is no fun.

If you got other possible explanations, please feel free to tell us about it.

The attack of wolves and a lot more of the church wall. Licence: public domain

Further Reading

Arthur Join-Lambert, Jean De Witte, François Lenormant, Robert de Lasteyrie : Les Inscriptions (Rébus et Énigmes) de l’Église de Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre in Gazette archéologique : recueil de monuments pour servir à la connaissance et à l’histoire de l’art antique. Vol. 13, published by A. Levy in Paris in 1888 p. 233–244, ISSN=20224788 (French)

l’église de saint Grégoire-du-Vièvre in Epistola, published on 2004-10-4 (French)

Bernard Bodinier: L’Eure de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Published by Jean-Michel Bordessoules in Saint-Jean-d’Angély in 2001, p.212 ISBN=2-913471-28-5 (French)

le mystère de Saint Grégoire. in Normandie Zoom (French)

Stripes and trees

Hiervon gibts keine deutsche Version.
In spring the landscape here has a lot of stripes. More than usual. No matter what problems I have and what kind of events brought me here, here is now my home and it’s nearly always the most beautiful place in the world.

I know this kind of intensive agriculture is bad for the country. But it looks good though and it’s still better than a city. Maybe the farmers are used to my standing at the road or of my crouching on the ground by now. I’m sad if I see something beautiful and forgot my camera. Here I was waiting until the tractor reached that place. Sadly I spoiled the colour a bit. I was fiddling around with the contrast and when I noticed it had changed the colour of the sky, I had already deleted the original photograph. Ah well. It’s not that bad. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The silo and water tower of Neuville-sur-Authou on one of those days when we can see very far. It’s possible, that Brionne is that town in the distance. Villages far away seem so near on these days. There are other days on which we can hear things that are far away very clear, as if they were near. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

A cherry blossom, on a rather exotic cherry tree in the village. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Some things didn’t change. 1957 was yesterday. There were four prize badges like this on the door of the box of a horse. No idea where this horse show took place. I don’t think the Concours Hippique de Valmont is still held. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Even on a grey day on a graveyard it’s beautiful. At least in this direction. 😉 Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Close-up of colza on a field. I really don’t mind grey sky too much. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The dogs love the view over the hills. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

There was loads of rain in May. Sometimes we had a sunny moment, like in this photo. The sun is chasing the clouds over the fields. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

That’s the awesome view Farbexplosion (cat) has from the window of her room. The sun goes down, time to go and hunt some mice. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Der Neandertaler von Marcilly-sur-Eure

Rekonstruktionsversuch eines Neandertalers im Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte Sachsen-Anhalt in Halle. Er denkt wohl gerade darüber nach, wie ulkig Archäologie ist. Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported.


Als 1841 die Bahnstrecke von Évreux nach Dreux in Marcilly-sur-Eure gebaut wurde, fanden die Arbeiter im Bereich hinter dem Schloss Mésangère ein Skelett in einer Schicht aus rotem mittelpaläolithischem (300.000 bis 30.000 v. Chr.) Alluvialboden. Einer der Arbeiter warf den Schädel auf einen Steinhaufen und der Schädel zerbrach in kleine Stücke, nur das dicke Stirnbein blieb erhalten. Als ich das las, bekam ich zuerst wieder einmal die Historikerkrise: “oh neiiiin, wie konnten sie das nur tun?” Nachdem ich dann aber das Gehirn eingeschaltet hatte, musste ich zugeben, dass es mir vielleicht ähnlich gegangen wäre. Ist ja nicht unbedingt schön irgendeins Dings zu finden, man zieht es aus der Modke und es stellt sich heraus, dass es ein Schädel ist. “Iiiiih!” Womöglich ließ der Arbeiter den Schädel quiekend fallen. Man denkt ja auch nicht gleich an Ur- und Frühgeschichte, wenn man irgendeinen Fund macht. Es hätte auch ein deutlich frischeres Skelett sein können, zum Beispiel aus der Revolutionszeit. Gestorben wird immer. Wie auch immer die Sache abgelaufen ist, übrig blieb nur das Stirnbein. Damals gab es noch keine Radiokarbonmethode oder DNA-Analyse. Es gab aber schon die ersten Experten, die sich das Stirnbein ansahen und verkündeten, es sei neandertalerhaft. Das ging damals als Sensation durch die Presse.

Erst im 20. Jahrhundert ließ Dominique Gambier (*1947), der damalige Rektor der Universität von Rouen den Knochen erneut untersuchen. Blöderweise war das Original inzwischen verschwunden. Auch darüber könnte man sich in eine Historikerkrise hineinsteigern, das kann aber auch an den Weltkriegen liegen. Also wurde eine Kopie untersucht, die sie noch im Musée d’archéologie nationale in Saint-Germain-en-Laye herumfliegen hatten. Das Stirnbein sieht zwar robust auf, weist aber nicht die Merkmale eines Neandertalers auf, sondern stammt von einem anatomisch modernen Menschen (Cro-Magnon). Die Bodenschicht, in der das Skelett gefunden worden war, war einfach zu dünn für eine genaue Datierung.

“Das ist doch auch nicht schlecht”, scheint dieser anatomisch moderne Mann zu sagen. Vor bis zu 30.000 Jahren, könnte er in Marcilly-sur-Eure herumgehangen haben. Das ist eine forensische Gesichtskonstruktion von Cicero Moraes. Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported.

Im 20. Jahrhundert wurden noch diverse andere frühgeschichtliche Funde in Marcilly gemacht. Mit Hilfe von Luftbildarchäologie wurden 1976 und 1980 bronzezeitliche (3200-600 v. Chr.) Siedlungsspuren entdeckt. 1967 wurde ein Wagengrab aus dem Spätlatène (150–30 v. Chr.) gefunden. 1982 wurden Siedlungsspren aus dem Spätlatène entdeckt, die in den folgenden zwei Jahren durch eine Ausgrabung untersucht wurden.

Siedlungsspuren aus der Hallstattzeit (800–475 v. Chr.) wurden bisher im Département Eure nur an den Flüssen Seine und Eure gefunden, denn die Flüsse dienten als Transportwege.

Der Fluss Eure in Marcilly-sur-Eure. Foto von Félix Potuit. Lizenz: gemeinfrei.

Weiterführende Informationen

Bernard Bodinier: L’Eure de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’Angély 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, S. 16, 26, 52 f. (französisch).

Dominique Cliquet: L’Eure. 27. In: Michel Provost, Academie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Ministere de la culture: Carte Archéologique de la Gaule. Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris 1993, ISBN 2-87754-018-9, 597, S. 36–45, 240 f. (französisch).

Für diesen kleinen Artikel hab ich zwei von mir selbst erstellt, beziehungsweise in dieser Hinsicht ergänzte Wikipediaartikel verwurstet, weil ich faul bin. Es handelt sich um Marcilly-sur-Eure und Département Eure. Die Artikel stehen unter der Lizenz CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported.

Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag
Der Neandertaler von Marcilly-sur-Eure steht unter einer Creative Commons Namensnennung – Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Unported Lizenz.

Carsix, hometown of Marie de Carsi

Carsix ist eine French commune with 245 inhabitants in the region Haute-Normandie. Nowadays it’s best known in the area for the gigantic hardware store in the hamlet of Malbrouck. Markets have most likely been held at that place since Gallo-Roman times (52BC to 486AD).

History

The village has been mentioned for the first time in 1180. At that time the name was Caresis.

Marie de Carsi(x) lived in the late 13th early 14th century. She was the daughter of Picard, seigneur of Carsix, who died early. Marie was sent to the court after the death of her father. She met Guccius Miri, married him and got a baby around the same time like the queen Clementia of Hungary. Therefore she became the nourrice of John the Posthumous (15 November 1316 – 20 November 1316), who only lived for 5 days. There’s a problem with dead princes, they never seem to be really dead. Maurice Druon wrote 6 novels about The Accursed Kings in 1966. The kings he calls accursed were the last 5 Capetian kings from Philip IV of France to John II.. Father of John the Posthumous was Louis the Quarreler (4 October 1289 – 5 June 1316). Seems like everybody died young in those times. Marie de Carsi has a very nice role in the books of Druon. He calls her Marie de Cressay and describes her as a very loyal person. Because it was known, that John the Posthumous might be killed (the normal reason for the short life span of those kings), she exchanged the little king with her own son. And when her son was killed at the place of John the Posthumous, she raised the little king as her own child. That sounds so great it must be true? There might be a small chance it was like this. We will never know. It’s funny that a man who claimed to be John the Posthumous showed up at the times of John II of France (1319 –1364).

Death procession of John the Posthumous. Licence: public domain because of age.

In Carsix life went on. At the end of the 14th century the seigneurs of Thibouville owned the village. In 1560 Pierre II du Fay, vicomte de Pont-Audemer got both, Thibouville and Carsix. In the 17th century the Carsix-du-Fays even got their own family branch. The village belonged to them until the French Revolution (1789–1799) and they kept the castle until the begin of the 20th century.

18th century entry gate. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

In the Second World War (1939–1945) the Germans occupied the village and used the castle as headquarters. After the flight of the Germans the castle was used as military hospital and dead soldiers were buried in its park.

Sightseeing

Pierre-Georges du Fay has built the castle of Carsix in 1741 on the foundation of an older building. Pierre-Georges’ son Pierre-Philippe has built a chapel. The castle has two side wings. The façade consists of red brick and white stone.

Georges du Fay, and I got to say it again, I wish they had been more creative concerning first names, married in 1900 and moved to the Basse-Normandie. He sold the castle.

After the Second World War the castle was abandoned and parts were destroyed by mould. When a private company bought the castle in 1966, only one of the Louis-quinze rooms had been intact. The castle has been restored afterwards.

The castle of Carsix. I’m definitely no paparazzo, if a castle is privately owned I do not walk in. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Carsix has 31 timber-framed houses and farms that were built in the 17th to 19th century.

Patron saint of the Roman-Catholic church Saint-Martin is Martin of Tours. The nave was built in the 12th century, the choir was rebuilt in the 14th century, church tower and roof of the nave have been restored in the 16th century. The whole church was restored in the 19th century.

Further Reading (French)

Old postcards of Carsix

Carsix on the website of the Préfecture of Eure

Le village de Carsix. In: Annuaire-Mairie.fr

Ernest Nègre: Toponymie générale de la France. 1, Librairie Droz, 1990, ISBN 2-6000-2883-8, p. 53

Frédéric Galeron: Statistique de l’arrondissement de Falaise. 3, Brée l’aîné, Falaise 1829, p. 123

Carsix – notice communal. In: Cassini.ehess.fr.

Raymond Bordeaux: Statistique routière de Lisieux à la frontière de Normandie. In: Annuaire Normand. Delos, Caen 1849

Bernard Bodinier (Hrsg.): L’Eure de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’Angély 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, p. 246

Franck Beaumont, Philippe Seydoux: Gentilhommières des pays de l’Eure. Editions de la Morande, Paris 1999, ISBN 2-902091-31-2 , p. 281f

Notre Dame de Charentonne. Diocèse d’Évreux

Commune : Carsix (27131). Thème : Tous les thèmes. In: Insee.fr. Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques

Eintrag Nr. 27131 in the Base Mérimée of the Ministère de la Culture

Henry de Servignat: Quatre enigmes royales. In: Dossiers de la petite histoire. Nouvelles Editions Latines, 1958, p. 38–67

Brune de Crespt: Jean Ier, l’enfant qui régna cinq jours. In: Historia Nostra. Alix Ducret

Marie de Carsi

Carsix, Baumärkte und mittelalterliche Geheimnisse

Carsix ist eine französische Gemeinde mit 245 Einwohnern (Stand 1. Januar 2010) im Département Eure in der Region Haute-Normandie.

Carsix liegt hier um die Ecke. Der Weiler Malbrouck an der ehemaligen Route nationale 13 (seit 2006 D613) gehört zur Gemeinde. Da gibt es ein Gewerbegebiet mit dem größten Baumarkt der Gegend. Lustigerweise haben Märkte an dem Ort eine jahrhundertelange Tradition.

Geschichte

Die Ortschaft wurde 1180 unter dem Namen Caresis erstmals erwähnt. Marie de Carsi(x) war die Tochter von Picard von Carsix, dem damaligen Seigneur von Carsix, der jedoch schon verstorben war als Marie in die Geschichte der unseligen Könige verstrickt wurde. Marie wurde die Amme von Johann I. (15. bis 19. November 1316), auch Johann der Posthume genannt, da er nach dem Tod seines Vaters geboren wurde. Sie taucht als Marie de Cressay in den historischen Romanen von Maurice Druon auf. Dort tauscht sie ihr eigenes Kind gegen den neugeborenen König aus, da ein Anschlag auf dessen Leben befürchtet wurde. Das getötete Kind war ihr eigentlicher Sohn und Johann überlebte. Laut einem anderen (unbequellten) Wikipedia-Artikel soll zur Zeit Johanns II. (1319 –1364) ein Mann aufgetaucht sein, der behauptete, Johann I. zu sein. Tote Königskinder neigen dazu wiederaufzutauchen. Um das nochmal klarzustellen, Druon hat sich das mit dem Kindstausch ausgedacht, aber er hat es sich sehr plausibel ausgedacht.

Totenprozession Johanns des Posthumen. Bild ist gemeinfrei aufgrund seines Alters.

Die Ländereien von Carsix gehörten gegen Ende des 14. Jahrhunderts dem Seigneur von Thibouville. Durch Heirat der Erbin von Thibouville erhielt Henri de Gouvis Carsix im Jahr 1420. Im Jahr 1560 erhielt Pierre II. du Fay, vicomte de Pont-Audemer, die Seigneurie. Im 17. Jahrhundert wurde ein Familienzweig Fay de Carsix gegründet. Die Seigneurie blieb bis zur Französischen Revolution (1789–1799) im Besitz der Familie.

1793 erhielt Carsix im Zuge der Französischen Revolution den Status einer Gemeinde und 1801 durch die Verwaltungsreform unter Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) unter dem Namen Carsi das Recht auf kommunale Selbstverwaltung. Auch wenn die Seigneurien durch die Revolution aufgelöst wurden, blieb die Familie Fay bis zum Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts im Besitz des Schlosses.

Das Schloss hinter dem schmucken barocken Eingangstor. Eigenes Foto auf Wikimedia Commons, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Am 28. August 1833 reiste König Louis-Philippe I. (1773–1850) durch Carsix. Zur Erinnerung daran wurde fortan ein zweiter großer Markt in Malbrouck gehalten, nämlich da, wo heute das Gewerbegebiet ist.

Im Zweiten Weltkrieg (1939–1945) besetzte die Wehrmacht die Gemeinde und nutzte das Schloss als Kommandantur. Nach der Flucht der Deutschen diente das Schloss als Hospital. Der Schlosspark fungierte währenddessen als Soldatenfriedhof. Die Deutschen haben sich hier nicht so sagenhaft beliebt gemacht.

Kultur und Sehenswürdigkeiten

Das Schloss von Carsix wurde von Pierre-Georges du Fay um 1741 auf den Fundamenten eines älteren Gebäudes errichtet. Durch das “du” nicht verwirren lassen, das ist schon die gleiche Familie, nur das “de”, ‘von’ änderte sich im Laufe der Zeit, manchmal fiel es auch ganz weg. Pierre-Georges Sohn Pierre-Philippe ließ die seigneuriale Kapelle bauen. Das Schloss hat zwei Seitenflügel. Die Fassade besteht aus rotem Backstein und hellem Naturstein. Nach seiner Heirat im Jahr 1900 zog Georges du Fay in das Département Manche und verkaufte das Schloss in Carsix. Es wechselte daraufhin mehrfach den Besitzer. Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg wurden Teile der Schlosses durch Schimmel zerstört. Als eine private Gesellschaft 1966 das Gebäude erwarb, war im Gebäudeinneren nur ein original eingerichteter Raum im Stil des Louis-quinze erhalten.

Das Schloss von Carsix. Näher ran hab ich mich nicht getraut. Es ist ja irgendwie im Privatbesitz und wirkte auch privat. Ich benehme mich normalerweise dann auch nicht daneben und geh einfach rein. Hier jedenfalls nicht. Eigenes Foto auf Wikimedia Commons, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

An der Straße nach Plasnes steht ein Herrenhaus mit Taubenhaus im Stil des Klassizismus des frühen 19. Jahrhunderts.

In Carsix gibt es 31 Häuser und Bauernhöfe aus dem 17. bis 19. Jahrhundert. Neun davon wurden bisher von der staatlichen Denkmalsbehörde besichtigt, die meisten davon stammten aus dem 18. Jahrhundert.

Schutzpatron der Kirche Saint-Martin ist Martin von Tours. Das Kirchenschiff wurde zu Beginn des 12. Jahrhunderts errichtet, der Chor wurde im 14. Jahrhundert umgebaut, Kirchturm und Dach des Kirchenschiffs wurden im 16. Jahrhundert ergänzt beziehungsweise erneuert. Im 19. Jahrhundert wurde die Kirche restauriert.

Weiterführende Informationen (deutsch)

Maurice Druon: Die unseligen Könige. In: DER SPIEGEL 3/1959

Die unseligen Könige. amazon.de

Weiterführende Informationen (französisch)

Alte Postkarten aus Carsix im Départementsarchiv

Carsix auf der Webseite der Préfecture Eure

Le village de Carsix. In: Annuaire-Mairie.fr

Ernest Nègre: Toponymie générale de la France. 1, Librairie Droz, 1990, ISBN 2-6000-2883-8, S. 53

Frédéric Galeron: Statistique de l’arrondissement de Falaise. 3, Brée l’aîné, Falaise 1829, S. 123

Carsix – notice communal. In: Cassini.ehess.fr.

Raymond Bordeaux: Statistique routière de Lisieux à la frontière de Normandie. In: Annuaire Normand. Delos, Caen 1849

Bernard Bodinier (Hrsg.): L’Eure de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’Angély 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, S. 246

Franck Beaumont, Philippe Seydoux: Gentilhommières des pays de l’Eure. Editions de la Morande, Paris 1999, ISBN 2-902091-31-2 , S. 281f

Notre Dame de Charentonne. Diocèse d’Évreux

Commune : Carsix (27131). Thème : Tous les thèmes. In: Insee.fr. Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques

Eintrag Nr. 27131 in der Base Mérimée des französischen Kulturministeriums

Henry de Servignat: Quatre enigmes royales. In: Dossiers de la petite histoire. Nouvelles Editions Latines, 1958, S. 38–67

Brune de Crespt: Jean Ier, l’enfant qui régna cinq jours. In: Historia Nostra. Alix Ducret

Marie de Carsi

Dies ist eine Verwurstung meines eigenen Wikidiaartikels.
Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag
Dieses Werk bzw. Inhalt steht unter einer Creative Commons Namensnennung – Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Unported Lizenz.