Fog

Most of November was looking like this:

The Fog

or like this:

misty landscape

We had some minutes of sun in between two banks of grey clouds though. I liked this a lot:

Spider silk in the sun

Spider silk glistening in the sun. never seen that much spider silk before. Busy spiders. Saw this on a walk with the dogs up the hill in front of the property.

Rudi (terrier) got a new grey sweater for Christmas. He’s already wearing it and scares the sheep. Sheep are confused by and afraid of new colours. They don’t change their colour and expect everybody else to be like them.

The sheep wonder about Rudi's new sweater

Advertisements

Mond über der Weide

English version here.

“Pasturage”, das englische Wort für ‘Weide’, ist ein grässlich schwieriges Wort. Hat ewig gedauert, bis ich es aussprechen konnte. Ich musste mir erst eine Sprachdatei anhören. Jedesmal wenn ich es falsch aussprach, schaute Chefin komisch aus der Wäsche, sagte aber nie etwas dazu. Wahrscheinlich hält sie mich für dumm. Macht nichts, weiter gehts! Das französische Wort “pâturage” ist übrigens einfacher für Deutsche, es spricht sich patüraasch.

Mond über der Weide. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Ich hab während des Sommers kaum Sonnenuntergangsfotos gemacht. Aber jetzt geht es wieder los. Je früher der Sonnenuntergang, desto hübscher ist er, oder desto mehr Fotos mache ich von ihm. Keine Ahnung. Von Herbst bis Frühjahr ist Sonnenuntergangssaison.

Sonnenuntergang über Le Villeret. Ein weiterer lila Abend. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Continue Reading

Walking with the sheep

Deutsche Version: In einer Reihe dem Ende des Sommers entgegen.
We decided to end the “summer” and reenter the pasturage. To walk in the park in the morning and to walk on the pasturage in the evening. To sleep in the stable.

Bach says that’s really exciting.

I have seen galleries like this on Misaki’s Blog and wanted galleries as well.

The rebus of Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre

Deutsche Version: hier.
Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre is a village with 342 inhabitants. It lies a bit north of here, right behind Saint-Victor-d’Épine. (The author waves with her arm in the direction of the colza fields.) I never took photos there, shame on me. If I ever get a car again, I’ll drive there and take photos for sure. The village is best known for a 16th century rebus designed with dark flintstone on the southern façade of the church Saint-Grégoire (Pope Gregory I.).

Edit: in the meantime I drove with one of my villagers (who complained about the pictures in this article) to Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre and we took photos.)

The 16th century rebus. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0 / Creative Commons public domain dedication

Generations of historians and other crazy folks have tried to decipher the rebus. The solution is something like “le monde est corrompu et faux sal” (French, since it’s in France), which means ‘the world is corrupt and deceptive sal’. No idea about “sal”. I’d say it’s the name or the initials of the author.

Arthur Join-Lambert (1839–1917) explains the rebus in the above mentioned book as follows. “Le” (‘the’) is written in normal letters. Then follows a globus cruciger that stands for the world or for the Christian world. Then follows the word “est” (‘is’) in normal letters and a bugle (“cor”) that is interrupted or broken in the middle. “Cor” inter “rupt”.

Grave of Arthur Join-Lambert on the cemetery of Livet-sur-Authou. That’s a bit northeast of here, over a hill in a valley. (The author waves her left arm in direction of the colza fields.) He was one of the locals. A local in a castle, but still a local. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons CC0 1.0 Universal Public Domain

Join-Lambert claims that the 16 black and white fields represent the 16th century. ‘The Christian world in the 16th century is corrupt and deceptive sal.’ That would refer to the French Wars of Religion (1562–1598). Strange but true, the little village of Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre was owned by the kings of France from the 14th to the 16th century. Last king who directly owned the village was the huguenot Henry IV of France (1553–1610). He was involved in the wars.

Bigger towns in the vicinity, like Bernay and Pont-Audemer, were attacked in 1590, either by the Catholics or by the Huguenots. (The result is the same, the troops plunder and the inhabitants die.)

The rebus and the knight who chases his horse. Licence: public domain

The 16 fields are followed by the word “et” (‘and’) and a very well designed scythe. The French word for scythe is “faux”. “Faux” is a homonym, it means scythe or wrong (deceptive). And “faux” is one of those words that sound like hundreds of other French words. I don’t understand how French people get along. Okay I am exaggerating a bit. Only a bit. Join-Lambert thought, that it probably means something that sounds alike but is different. For example “faut” 3rd person singular of “falloir”, ‘having to do something’, ‘needing’. At this point I started to worry about Join-Lambert’s mental health. ‘The Christian world in the 16th century is corrupt and (one) has to sal.’? That makes no sense. He must have been drinking laudanum. He continues: “sal” means Israel, the missing letters have been miraculously incorporated in the “A”. Or somewhere else. Enough is enough. No, Join-Lambert, you’re wrong. And it’s not a freemason-inscription either. Early freemasons existed in England, that’s right, but they wouldn’t have made French rebuses.

The knight follows his horse. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative Commons public domain dedication

According to Fulcanelli the ensemble of flintstone figures on the whole church had alchemistic denotation. He starts with the knight who is running after his horse. Horses are fountains in alchemy and the knight is ‘Hermes Trismegistus unveiled’, the inscription is the ‘triumph of Hermes’ and an attack of wolves is the battle of two natures. That would be impressive… if it wasn’t boring.

Attack by wolves, own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC0/ Creative commons public domain dedication

In mediaeval times Vièvre was a forest that covered the area from Saint-Étienne-l’Allier to the river Risle. It had a surface of approximately 50km² (19.31 square miles, 5000 hectars). The forest was full of wild animals, bears, wild boars and wolves. It is far more likely that the artistic mason used the walls of the church as some kind of newspaper, a narrative of events. Something like: King Henry fell off his horse. Wolves attacked villagers or their livestock. Living in times of religious war is no fun.

If you got other possible explanations, please feel free to tell us about it.

The attack of wolves and a lot more of the church wall. Licence: public domain

Further Reading

Arthur Join-Lambert, Jean De Witte, François Lenormant, Robert de Lasteyrie : Les Inscriptions (Rébus et Énigmes) de l’Église de Saint-Grégoire-du-Vièvre in Gazette archéologique : recueil de monuments pour servir à la connaissance et à l’histoire de l’art antique. Vol. 13, published by A. Levy in Paris in 1888 p. 233–244, ISSN=20224788 (French)

l’église de saint Grégoire-du-Vièvre in Epistola, published on 2004-10-4 (French)

Bernard Bodinier: L’Eure de la Préhistoire à nos jours. Published by Jean-Michel Bordessoules in Saint-Jean-d’Angély in 2001, p.212 ISBN=2-913471-28-5 (French)

le mystère de Saint Grégoire. in Normandie Zoom (French)

Besuch, unter anderem von einer Méhari

English version is here.

Besuch ist, was ich nicht haben darf, denn Besuch gefährdet die Sicherheit. So ist das, wenn man auf der Arbeit wohnt und spezielle Chefs hat. Vor bestimmten englischen Bekannten habe ich Besuch immer verschwiegen, da sie den Chefs zu nahe stehen. Was dazu führte, dass sie meinen, ich bekäme nie Besuch. Das kann man so nicht sagen, aber ich und die Hunde sind wahrscheinlich schon häufiger selbst Besuch bei jemandem, als dass ich Besuch bekomme. Wenn ich sowieso mit den Hunde spazierengeh, können wir auch gleich wen besuchen. Manchmal passiert auch beides an einem Tag.

Rudi, Phex und ich an “Asterix'” (Herr C.) Tor. Über ein Jahr lang hatte ich ihn andauernd eingeladen, aber er wollte uns nie besuchen und ich dachte schon, er hätte Gynophobie. Dabei seh ich so harmlos aus. Aber an diesem schönen Maientag überreichte er mir ein Zweiglein von dem hübschen Flieder und eilte ins Haus, um sich umzuziehen und dann gingen wir zu mir. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Gynophobie oder auch Gynäkophobie ist nicht etwa die Angst vor Frauenärzten, sondern vor Frauen. Ein Foto von “Asterix” gibt es diesmal nicht. Ich hab ihn schonmal fotografiert und auf Facebook herumgezeigt, das muss reichen.

Er verschwand also im Haus und ich wartete, fotografierte die Hunde und wartete noch mehr. Fragte mich, ob er sich schminkt. Als er wiederkam trug er eine andere Jacke. Männer!

Das Schloss hat ihm glaub ich gut gefallen, er ist genau wie ich, ganz geschichtsvernarrt, er wollte gar nicht wieder gehen.

Asterix fand die ganzen Zementbauten der deutschen Besatzer aus dem Zweiten Weltkrieg total interessant. Die waren versteckt, und von oben mit Gras getarnt, so dass die alliierte Luftwaffe sie nicht sehen konnte. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Ein paar Tage später kam der “Finne”, um sich dieses Schloss und das Schloss in Berthouville anzugucken. Damals dachten wir beiden naiven Gestalten noch, dass dieses Schloss zum Verkauf stünde. Wenn ich daran denke, überkommt mich der Wunsch nach einem Eis oder Kuchen. Aber nein, vade retro doppelkinnförderndes Zeugs.

Immerhin wollte er eh nach Berthouville. Ich spielte Chauffeuse. Also ich hab ihm nicht die Füße ins Feuer gehalten, wie Chauffeure das traditionell in Eure machten, sondern ihn im chefesquen Auto herumgefahren. So kam ich auch endlich in das Schloss in Berthouville, ich benahm mich aber und fotografierte nicht. Deshalb hatte ich auch im Vorfeld das dortige Schloss so intensiv von außen abgelichtet.

Der Bahnhof in Bernay. Dort holte ich den Mann ab. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

War nicht so sagenhaftes Wetter, der ganze Mai war ja verregnet. Alle Reisenden versteckten sich drinnen. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Lustig war, dass ich die Maklerin kannte, weil die auch hier schonmal tätig war. Sie sagt, sie warte immer noch auf Antwort von Chefin. Haha. Das erklärt vielleicht den Wechsel der Email. Sie will auch mit mir in Kontakt bleiben, aber ich glaub, das wird nun nichts mehr. Hach Schade.

An dem Tag hatte es geregnet. Das Gras war total nass und meine Schlaghose (jaja falsche Hosenwahl) durchnässt bis zum Knie. Hier bei diesem Gebäude versuchte ich mit Brutalität und Geschick anzugeben und öffnete auch souverän die rechte Tür. Die linke Tür ging aber nicht auf. Ich rüttelte und schüttelte. Schließlich schaltete ich das Gehirn ein, sah mir die Sache genauer an und stellte fest.. die Tür öffnet sich nach innen. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Außerdem war Wächter aus der Provence zu Besuch, der die gleichen Chefs hat. Und die Tochter von befreundeten Bauern mit ihrem Mann. Davon gibt es jeweils keine Fotos. Alain war noch da, er wollte gern den Bratspießdrehautomaten erwerben, aber das wird wohl nix werden.

Bratspießdrehapparat aus dem 18. Jahrhundert. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Dann kam er wieder vorbei, diesmal um mir sein Auto zu zeigen. Eine Citroën Méhari (französische Autos sind ja weiblich). Ich durfte damit sogar herumfahren und wir landeten schließlich mit Alains Bruder und dem Bürgermeister bei Alain und seiner Frau Liliane im Garten, wo es Cidre und Poiré gab (Apfel- beziehungsweise Birnenschaumwein). Uralte Flaschen aus der hintersten Ecke des Kellers, mit jeder Menge Flocken. Das meiste landete im Blumenbeet.

Die Méhari wird von Phex und Bach genau untersucht. Eigenes Foto auf Flickr, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Weitere Fotos von Alains Méhari findet man in dem Ordner auf Flickr: hier. Rudi fuhr hinten drin mit und Alains Bruder hielt ihn zusätzlich zum Hundesicherheitsgurt fest. Rudi fand das toll. Er stellte sich auf die Ecke und hielt die Nase in den Wind.

Ich falte mich in die Méhari und ziehe ganz unvorteilhaft das Kinn ein. Foto von Alain Cardinal. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Ich falte mich in die Méhari und ziehe ganz unvorteilhaft das Kinn ein. Foto von Alain Cardinal. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Ich am Steuer, Alains Bruder hinten und Rudi guckt ganz hinten um die Ecke. Foto von Alain Cardinal, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Ich am Steuer, Alains Bruder hinten und Rudi guckt hinten um die Ecke. Foto von Alain Cardinal, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Die Fotografen fotografieren. Links Alains Bruder und geradeaus Alain, der sich hinter seinem Fotoapparat versteckt. Eigenes Foto, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Die Fotografen fotografieren. Links Alains Bruder und geradeaus Alain, der sich hinter seinem Fotoapparat versteckt. Eigenes Foto, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Der Bürgermeister, ich (mit der Sonne in der Fresse und das schon wieder das Kinn einziehend) und Alains Bruder. Liliane versteckt sich ganz links hinter einer Blume. Foto von Alain Cardinal, Alle Rechte vorbehalten

Links der Bürgermeister von Morsan, ich mittig (mit der Sonne in der Fresse und das Kinn einziehend) und Alains Bruder rechts. Liliane versteckt sich ganz links hinter einer Blume. Foto von Alain Cardinal, Alle Rechte vorbehalten

Visiting the Citroën Méhari

Deutsche Version: hier.
I may not get visitors, but we walk a lot (me and the dogs) and visit people.

Rudi, Phex and me at the gate of “Asterix'” (M C.) gate. On that day he was cutting a lilac branch for me. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

I took a photo of Asterix last winter and showed it on Facebook, that has to be enough.

In May one visitor was allowed though, he visited this castle and the castle in Berthouville. We both thought this castle was still for sale. But we were wrong. Before he came here, me and the dogs made photos of the castle in Berthouville.

I picked him up at the train station in Bernay. It was raining. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

All the travellers were hiding inside. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

In Berthouville we met the real estate agent. Quite funny, I’ve seen her before when she tried to sell this castle. It was a happy reunion, we exchanged email adresses and promised to meet again. Alas, that’s not very likely now.

On that day the grass was longer and it was raining. The grass was wet and stupid me was wearing “city clothes”, my jeans were wet up to the knee. At this building I tried to show how energetic I am. I managed to open the right door. Then I was rattling in vain at the left door until I noticed, that it opens to the inside. Embarrassing. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Another authorised visitor was the guardian of the other castle in the Provence. He came with a friend. They brought Cidre, we drank some.

On this 18th century kitchen spit rotating machine end the visitors, that do not behave. Barbecue. No, don’t worry just kidding. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

In June Alain picked me up at the gate with his Citroën Méhari. I was allowed to drive and we took Rudi with us. It was so much fun.

Phex and Bach examine the Méhari. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

More photos of Alain’s Méhari are in a set on Flickr.

I'm folding myself into the Méhari. Photo by Alain Cardinal. All Rights reserved.

I’m folding myself into the Méhari. Photo by Alain Cardinal. All Rights reserved.

Ich am Steuer, Alains Bruder hinten und Rudi guckt ganz hinten um die Ecke. Foto von Alain Cardinal, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Me in the front, Alain’s brother in the back and Rudi in the back of the back. Photo by Alain Cardinal. All Rights reserved.

Die Fotografen fotografieren. Links Alains Bruder und geradeaus Alain, der sich hinter seinem Fotoapparat versteckt. Eigenes Foto, Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Taking photos of the photographers. On the left Alain’s brother, Alain himself behind the camera. Photo by stanzebla. All Rights reserved.

From left to right, Liliane behind a flower, the mayor of Morsan, me and Alain's brother. Photo by Alain Cardinal. All Rights reserved.

From left to right, Liliane behind a flower, the mayor of Morsan, me and Alain’s brother. Photo by Alain Cardinal. All Rights reserved.

Stripes and trees

Hiervon gibts keine deutsche Version.
In spring the landscape here has a lot of stripes. More than usual. No matter what problems I have and what kind of events brought me here, here is now my home and it’s nearly always the most beautiful place in the world.

I know this kind of intensive agriculture is bad for the country. But it looks good though and it’s still better than a city. Maybe the farmers are used to my standing at the road or of my crouching on the ground by now. I’m sad if I see something beautiful and forgot my camera. Here I was waiting until the tractor reached that place. Sadly I spoiled the colour a bit. I was fiddling around with the contrast and when I noticed it had changed the colour of the sky, I had already deleted the original photograph. Ah well. It’s not that bad. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The silo and water tower of Neuville-sur-Authou on one of those days when we can see very far. It’s possible, that Brionne is that town in the distance. Villages far away seem so near on these days. There are other days on which we can hear things that are far away very clear, as if they were near. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

A cherry blossom, on a rather exotic cherry tree in the village. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Some things didn’t change. 1957 was yesterday. There were four prize badges like this on the door of the box of a horse. No idea where this horse show took place. I don’t think the Concours Hippique de Valmont is still held. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Even on a grey day on a graveyard it’s beautiful. At least in this direction. 😉 Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Close-up of colza on a field. I really don’t mind grey sky too much. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The dogs love the view over the hills. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

There was loads of rain in May. Sometimes we had a sunny moment, like in this photo. The sun is chasing the clouds over the fields. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

That’s the awesome view Farbexplosion (cat) has from the window of her room. The sun goes down, time to go and hunt some mice. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported