Stripes and trees

Hiervon gibts keine deutsche Version.
In spring the landscape here has a lot of stripes. More than usual. No matter what problems I have and what kind of events brought me here, here is now my home and it’s nearly always the most beautiful place in the world.

I know this kind of intensive agriculture is bad for the country. But it looks good though and it’s still better than a city. Maybe the farmers are used to my standing at the road or of my crouching on the ground by now. I’m sad if I see something beautiful and forgot my camera. Here I was waiting until the tractor reached that place. Sadly I spoiled the colour a bit. I was fiddling around with the contrast and when I noticed it had changed the colour of the sky, I had already deleted the original photograph. Ah well. It’s not that bad. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The silo and water tower of Neuville-sur-Authou on one of those days when we can see very far. It’s possible, that Brionne is that town in the distance. Villages far away seem so near on these days. There are other days on which we can hear things that are far away very clear, as if they were near. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

A cherry blossom, on a rather exotic cherry tree in the village. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Some things didn’t change. 1957 was yesterday. There were four prize badges like this on the door of the box of a horse. No idea where this horse show took place. I don’t think the Concours Hippique de Valmont is still held. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Even on a grey day on a graveyard it’s beautiful. At least in this direction. 😉 Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Close-up of colza on a field. I really don’t mind grey sky too much. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The dogs love the view over the hills. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

There was loads of rain in May. Sometimes we had a sunny moment, like in this photo. The sun is chasing the clouds over the fields. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

That’s the awesome view Farbexplosion (cat) has from the window of her room. The sun goes down, time to go and hunt some mice. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The Neanderthal of Marcilly-sur-Eure

Reconstruction of a Homo neanderthalensis at Landesmuseum fĂŒr Vorgeschichte Sachsen-Anhalt in Halle, Germany. He seems to muse about the odd course of time. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.


When the railroad line from Évreux to Dreux was built in 1841 in Marcilly-sur-Eure, the workers found a skeleton in the area behind the castle MĂ©sangĂšre in a layer of red Middle Palaeolithic (300,000 to 30,000 years ago) alluvium. The workers threw the skull on a pile of rubble and it broke into pieces. Only the frontal bone was left. On reading this my first thought was: “oh no, how stupid of them. How could they treat the skull like that?” But then, they probably thought the bones were the remains of someone who had died in the Revolution. And it’s not really pleasant to dig up skulls anyways. I imagine now, a worker was digging up something, pulled it out of the mud, saw it’s a skull and squeaked while he dropped it. Whatever happened, all that was left was the front bone. They had neither radiocarbon dating nor DNA tests at the time. Somehow the front bone got in the hands of “experts”. I couldn’t find any hint, who were those experts. They were very excited and declared it was the front bone of a Neanderthal. The news was a sensation.

In the 20th century Dominique Gambier (*1947) the rector of the University of Rouen wanted to find out, if it was really the front bone of a Neanderthal. Alas, the original bone was lost, probably a cause of the Second World War (1939-1945). So they examined a copy that was stored in the MusĂ©e d’archĂ©ologie nationale in Saint-Germain-en-Laye. They found out that the bone looks rather robust but belonged to an European Early Modern Human. The layer of alluvium in which the skeleton was found had been too thin to allow an exact age determination.

“Hey that’s not bad either”, says this European Early Modern man. Around 30,000 years ago, he might have been hanging around in Marcilly-sur-Eure. Forensic facial reconstruction by Cicero Moraes. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.

This wasn’t the only discovery in Marcilly, but it was the oldest. In the years 1976 and 1980 the archaeologists found traces of Bronze Age settlements (3200-600 BC) with the help of aerial archaeology. In 1967 a chariot burial site of the late La TĂšne culture (150–30 BC) was found. In 1982 more constructions of the late La TĂšne period were found, followed by an archaeological excavation in the two following years.

Archaeological sites of the Hallstatt culture (800–475 BC) and later in the dĂ©partement Eure were situated at the rivers Seine and Eure. The rivers were transportation routes.

The river Eure in Marcilly-sur-Eure. Photograph by FĂ©lix Potuit. This work is in the public domain.

Further Reading

Bernard Bodinier: L’Eure de la PrĂ©histoire Ă  nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’AngĂ©ly 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, p. 16, 26, 52 f. (French).

Dominique Cliquet: L’Eure. 27. In: Michel Provost, Academie des inscriptions et belles-lettres, Ministere de la culture: Carte ArchĂ©ologique de la Gaule. Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme, Paris 1993, ISBN 2-87754-018-9, 597, p. 36–45, 240 f. (French).

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The Neanderthal of Marcilly-sur-Eure is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Carsix, hometown of Marie de Carsi

Carsix ist eine French commune with 245 inhabitants in the region Haute-Normandie. Nowadays it’s best known in the area for the gigantic hardware store in the hamlet of Malbrouck. Markets have most likely been held at that place since Gallo-Roman times (52BC to 486AD).

History

The village has been mentioned for the first time in 1180. At that time the name was Caresis.

Marie de Carsi(x) lived in the late 13th early 14th century. She was the daughter of Picard, seigneur of Carsix, who died early. Marie was sent to the court after the death of her father. She met Guccius Miri, married him and got a baby around the same time like the queen Clementia of Hungary. Therefore she became the nourrice of John the Posthumous (15 November 1316 – 20 November 1316), who only lived for 5 days. There’s a problem with dead princes, they never seem to be really dead. Maurice Druon wrote 6 novels about The Accursed Kings in 1966. The kings he calls accursed were the last 5 Capetian kings from Philip IV of France to John II.. Father of John the Posthumous was Louis the Quarreler (4 October 1289 – 5 June 1316). Seems like everybody died young in those times. Marie de Carsi has a very nice role in the books of Druon. He calls her Marie de Cressay and describes her as a very loyal person. Because it was known, that John the Posthumous might be killed (the normal reason for the short life span of those kings), she exchanged the little king with her own son. And when her son was killed at the place of John the Posthumous, she raised the little king as her own child. That sounds so great it must be true? There might be a small chance it was like this. We will never know. It’s funny that a man who claimed to be John the Posthumous showed up at the times of John II of France (1319 –1364).

Death procession of John the Posthumous. Licence: public domain because of age.

In Carsix life went on. At the end of the 14th century the seigneurs of Thibouville owned the village. In 1560 Pierre II du Fay, vicomte de Pont-Audemer got both, Thibouville and Carsix. In the 17th century the Carsix-du-Fays even got their own family branch. The village belonged to them until the French Revolution (1789–1799) and they kept the castle until the begin of the 20th century.

18th century entry gate. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

In the Second World War (1939–1945) the Germans occupied the village and used the castle as headquarters. After the flight of the Germans the castle was used as military hospital and dead soldiers were buried in its park.

Sightseeing

Pierre-Georges du Fay has built the castle of Carsix in 1741 on the foundation of an older building. Pierre-Georges’ son Pierre-Philippe has built a chapel. The castle has two side wings. The façade consists of red brick and white stone.

Georges du Fay, and I got to say it again, I wish they had been more creative concerning first names, married in 1900 and moved to the Basse-Normandie. He sold the castle.

After the Second World War the castle was abandoned and parts were destroyed by mould. When a private company bought the castle in 1966, only one of the Louis-quinze rooms had been intact. The castle has been restored afterwards.

The castle of Carsix. I’m definitely no paparazzo, if a castle is privately owned I do not walk in. Own photo at Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Carsix has 31 timber-framed houses and farms that were built in the 17th to 19th century.

Patron saint of the Roman-Catholic church Saint-Martin is Martin of Tours. The nave was built in the 12th century, the choir was rebuilt in the 14th century, church tower and roof of the nave have been restored in the 16th century. The whole church was restored in the 19th century.

Further Reading (French)

Old postcards of Carsix

Carsix on the website of the Préfecture of Eure

Le village de Carsix. In: Annuaire-Mairie.fr

Ernest NÚgre: Toponymie générale de la France. 1, Librairie Droz, 1990, ISBN 2-6000-2883-8, p. 53

FrĂ©dĂ©ric Galeron: Statistique de l’arrondissement de Falaise. 3, BrĂ©e l’aĂźnĂ©, Falaise 1829, p. 123

Carsix – notice communal. In: Cassini.ehess.fr.

Raymond Bordeaux: Statistique routiĂšre de Lisieux Ă  la frontiĂšre de Normandie. In: Annuaire Normand. Delos, Caen 1849

Bernard Bodinier (Hrsg.): L’Eure de la PrĂ©histoire Ă  nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’AngĂ©ly 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, p. 246

Franck Beaumont, Philippe Seydoux: Gentilhommiùres des pays de l’Eure. Editions de la Morande, Paris 1999, ISBN 2-902091-31-2 , p. 281f

Notre Dame de Charentonne. Diocùse d’Évreux

Commune : Carsix (27131). ThĂšme : Tous les thĂšmes. In: Insee.fr. Institut national de la statistique et des Ă©tudes Ă©conomiques

Eintrag Nr. 27131 in the Base Mérimée of the MinistÚre de la Culture

Henry de Servignat: Quatre enigmes royales. In: Dossiers de la petite histoire. Nouvelles Editions Latines, 1958, p. 38–67

Brune de Crespt: Jean Ier, l’enfant qui rĂ©gna cinq jours. In: Historia Nostra. Alix Ducret

Marie de Carsi

Carsix, BaumÀrkte und mittelalterliche Geheimnisse

Carsix ist eine französische Gemeinde mit 245 Einwohnern (Stand 1. Januar 2010) im Département Eure in der Region Haute-Normandie.

Carsix liegt hier um die Ecke. Der Weiler Malbrouck an der ehemaligen Route nationale 13 (seit 2006 D613) gehört zur Gemeinde. Da gibt es ein Gewerbegebiet mit dem grĂ¶ĂŸten Baumarkt der Gegend. Lustigerweise haben MĂ€rkte an dem Ort eine jahrhundertelange Tradition.

Geschichte

Die Ortschaft wurde 1180 unter dem Namen Caresis erstmals erwĂ€hnt. Marie de Carsi(x) war die Tochter von Picard von Carsix, dem damaligen Seigneur von Carsix, der jedoch schon verstorben war als Marie in die Geschichte der unseligen Könige verstrickt wurde. Marie wurde die Amme von Johann I. (15. bis 19. November 1316), auch Johann der Posthume genannt, da er nach dem Tod seines Vaters geboren wurde. Sie taucht als Marie de Cressay in den historischen Romanen von Maurice Druon auf. Dort tauscht sie ihr eigenes Kind gegen den neugeborenen König aus, da ein Anschlag auf dessen Leben befĂŒrchtet wurde. Das getötete Kind war ihr eigentlicher Sohn und Johann ĂŒberlebte. Laut einem anderen (unbequellten) Wikipedia-Artikel soll zur Zeit Johanns II. (1319 –1364) ein Mann aufgetaucht sein, der behauptete, Johann I. zu sein. Tote Königskinder neigen dazu wiederaufzutauchen. Um das nochmal klarzustellen, Druon hat sich das mit dem Kindstausch ausgedacht, aber er hat es sich sehr plausibel ausgedacht.

Totenprozession Johanns des Posthumen. Bild ist gemeinfrei aufgrund seines Alters.

Die LĂ€ndereien von Carsix gehörten gegen Ende des 14. Jahrhunderts dem Seigneur von Thibouville. Durch Heirat der Erbin von Thibouville erhielt Henri de Gouvis Carsix im Jahr 1420. Im Jahr 1560 erhielt Pierre II. du Fay, vicomte de Pont-Audemer, die Seigneurie. Im 17. Jahrhundert wurde ein Familienzweig Fay de Carsix gegrĂŒndet. Die Seigneurie blieb bis zur Französischen Revolution (1789–1799) im Besitz der Familie.

1793 erhielt Carsix im Zuge der Französischen Revolution den Status einer Gemeinde und 1801 durch die Verwaltungsreform unter Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821) unter dem Namen Carsi das Recht auf kommunale Selbstverwaltung. Auch wenn die Seigneurien durch die Revolution aufgelöst wurden, blieb die Familie Fay bis zum Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts im Besitz des Schlosses.

Das Schloss hinter dem schmucken barocken Eingangstor. Eigenes Foto auf Wikimedia Commons, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Am 28. August 1833 reiste König Louis-Philippe I. (1773–1850) durch Carsix. Zur Erinnerung daran wurde fortan ein zweiter großer Markt in Malbrouck gehalten, nĂ€mlich da, wo heute das Gewerbegebiet ist.

Im Zweiten Weltkrieg (1939–1945) besetzte die Wehrmacht die Gemeinde und nutzte das Schloss als Kommandantur. Nach der Flucht der Deutschen diente das Schloss als Hospital. Der Schlosspark fungierte wĂ€hrenddessen als Soldatenfriedhof. Die Deutschen haben sich hier nicht so sagenhaft beliebt gemacht.

Kultur und SehenswĂŒrdigkeiten

Das Schloss von Carsix wurde von Pierre-Georges du Fay um 1741 auf den Fundamenten eines Ă€lteren GebĂ€udes errichtet. Durch das “du” nicht verwirren lassen, das ist schon die gleiche Familie, nur das “de”, ‘von’ Ă€nderte sich im Laufe der Zeit, manchmal fiel es auch ganz weg. Pierre-Georges Sohn Pierre-Philippe ließ die seigneuriale Kapelle bauen. Das Schloss hat zwei SeitenflĂŒgel. Die Fassade besteht aus rotem Backstein und hellem Naturstein. Nach seiner Heirat im Jahr 1900 zog Georges du Fay in das DĂ©partement Manche und verkaufte das Schloss in Carsix. Es wechselte daraufhin mehrfach den Besitzer. Nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg wurden Teile der Schlosses durch Schimmel zerstört. Als eine private Gesellschaft 1966 das GebĂ€ude erwarb, war im GebĂ€udeinneren nur ein original eingerichteter Raum im Stil des Louis-quinze erhalten.

Das Schloss von Carsix. NĂ€her ran hab ich mich nicht getraut. Es ist ja irgendwie im Privatbesitz und wirkte auch privat. Ich benehme mich normalerweise dann auch nicht daneben und geh einfach rein. Hier jedenfalls nicht. Eigenes Foto auf Wikimedia Commons, Lizenz: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

An der Straße nach Plasnes steht ein Herrenhaus mit Taubenhaus im Stil des Klassizismus des frĂŒhen 19. Jahrhunderts.

In Carsix gibt es 31 HÀuser und Bauernhöfe aus dem 17. bis 19. Jahrhundert. Neun davon wurden bisher von der staatlichen Denkmalsbehörde besichtigt, die meisten davon stammten aus dem 18. Jahrhundert.

Schutzpatron der Kirche Saint-Martin ist Martin von Tours. Das Kirchenschiff wurde zu Beginn des 12. Jahrhunderts errichtet, der Chor wurde im 14. Jahrhundert umgebaut, Kirchturm und Dach des Kirchenschiffs wurden im 16. Jahrhundert ergÀnzt beziehungsweise erneuert. Im 19. Jahrhundert wurde die Kirche restauriert.

WeiterfĂŒhrende Informationen (deutsch)

Maurice Druon: Die unseligen Könige. In: DER SPIEGEL 3/1959

Die unseligen Könige. amazon.de

WeiterfĂŒhrende Informationen (französisch)

Alte Postkarten aus Carsix im DĂ©partementsarchiv

Carsix auf der Webseite der Préfecture Eure

Le village de Carsix. In: Annuaire-Mairie.fr

Ernest NÚgre: Toponymie générale de la France. 1, Librairie Droz, 1990, ISBN 2-6000-2883-8, S. 53

FrĂ©dĂ©ric Galeron: Statistique de l’arrondissement de Falaise. 3, BrĂ©e l’aĂźnĂ©, Falaise 1829, S. 123

Carsix – notice communal. In: Cassini.ehess.fr.

Raymond Bordeaux: Statistique routiĂšre de Lisieux Ă  la frontiĂšre de Normandie. In: Annuaire Normand. Delos, Caen 1849

Bernard Bodinier (Hrsg.): L’Eure de la PrĂ©histoire Ă  nos jours. Jean-Michel Bordessoules, Saint-Jean-d’AngĂ©ly 2001, ISBN 2-913471-28-5, S. 246

Franck Beaumont, Philippe Seydoux: Gentilhommiùres des pays de l’Eure. Editions de la Morande, Paris 1999, ISBN 2-902091-31-2 , S. 281f

Notre Dame de Charentonne. Diocùse d’Évreux

Commune : Carsix (27131). ThĂšme : Tous les thĂšmes. In: Insee.fr. Institut national de la statistique et des Ă©tudes Ă©conomiques

Eintrag Nr. 27131 in der Base Mérimée des französischen Kulturministeriums

Henry de Servignat: Quatre enigmes royales. In: Dossiers de la petite histoire. Nouvelles Editions Latines, 1958, S. 38–67

Brune de Crespt: Jean Ier, l’enfant qui rĂ©gna cinq jours. In: Historia Nostra. Alix Ducret

Marie de Carsi

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Alone in Brionne

I really miss to drive with Rudi. My car situation is rather unclear at the moment and therefore I was alone in Brionne. Brionne is the chef-lieu of the canton I live in. And I got to go there several times a year (when I miss the postwoman). I’m always in a hurry, but this time I decided to run up the hill of the keep and take some photos. This village is rather flat and I do not often run up on hills therefore my gluteus maximus was hurting for some days. I should run to the keep more often.

The keep was built in the 11th century and it is protected cultural heritage since 1925.

Running up the hill and looking back to the west. This is what I saw. Brionne is beautiful but not in a good shape. The church tower belongs to the church Saint-Martin. The white building in the back is the train station. The hillside of the cemetery used to be a wineyard in medieval times. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

The slope of the keep. It doesn’t look very safe. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

Looking back to town through an entrance to the keep. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

View of the landscape south of Brionne. The lake of Brionne is 22 hectars huge. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

Northwestcorner of the keep. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

The walls of the keep are quite thick. You can see the different materials here, flint, mortar, bricks and granite. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

On the northeastern side of the ruin you can see the rests of a Romanesque fireplace and chimney. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

A Romanesque pilaster in the rests of the fireplace. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Brionne is a dogfriendly town. At the post office stands a dog waste bag dispenser and excrements container.

“The wastebags are here!” “It’s in the bag!” The expression “l’affaire est dans le sac!” has its origins in the Ancien RĂ©gime, the time of the French kings. At the end of a lawsuit, all papers concerning this lawsuit were put into one bag of leather or linen fabric. If a case is in the bag, it’s finished. Even the waste bag dispensers in France teach us culture and history… somehow. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

Going up the road to the west, the curious tourist reaches the Domaine de Lorraine. The domain was built at the beginning of the 18th century. It was named after the dukes of Lorraine, who were the seigneurs of Brionne. They were living in the manor house. The manor house is closed and empty nowadays. The farm buildings are used by the office of town twinning, the tourists office and the music school. The parc is open for the public.

The manor house and entrance to the park of the Domaine de Lorraine. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

Decoration on the pediment, over the entrance and window on the manor house in the park of Lorraine. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

The park of Lorraine in winter. Next to the manor house stands a huge tree. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

The office of town twinning. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

The Roman Catholic church Saint-Martin in Brionne was built in the 15th century. The ground floor is Romanesque, the upper floor is Gothic and the entrance was rebuilt in the 18th century. Some of the interior was brought there from Bec Abbey during the French Revolution (1789-1799). I think it’s usually closed, but am unsure. It was open on that day, but there had been a funeral mass or something like that. Lots of black dressed people gathered before the church when I went up the hill, so I entered the church later, when I came back.

The baptismal font in the church Saint-Martin. Own photo on Flickr, licence: Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

Statue of Madonna and Child in the church Saint-Martin in Brionne. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by/ Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported

The river Risle in Brionne. View to the north. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

After the short visit at the church I ran back to the car and drove home. Where my doggies were waiting for me and greeted me as if I had been away for centuries. We were very happy to be together again.