Round bales of straw look like Easter Island statues to me

Die deutsche Version dieses Artikels ist: hier.

Maybe I’m a bit strange. So many things look beautiful or exotic to me. I take far too many photographs. Round bales of straw, that lie around on the fields in August, look like Easter Island statues to me. I know they don’t have faces. That’s not what makes them so statuesque in my opinion. They were made by humans, they are quite big and they change the view of the landscape.

I took so many photographs in August, over 200, that it took ages to sort them. I got a lot of work atm. My situation didn’t really advance. But it’s pointless to complain. I’d rather show you a gallery of straw roll statues (with dogs).

Stripes and trees

Hiervon gibts keine deutsche Version.
In spring the landscape here has a lot of stripes. More than usual. No matter what problems I have and what kind of events brought me here, here is now my home and it’s nearly always the most beautiful place in the world.

I know this kind of intensive agriculture is bad for the country. But it looks good though and it’s still better than a city. Maybe the farmers are used to my standing at the road or of my crouching on the ground by now. I’m sad if I see something beautiful and forgot my camera. Here I was waiting until the tractor reached that place. Sadly I spoiled the colour a bit. I was fiddling around with the contrast and when I noticed it had changed the colour of the sky, I had already deleted the original photograph. Ah well. It’s not that bad. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The silo and water tower of Neuville-sur-Authou on one of those days when we can see very far. It’s possible, that Brionne is that town in the distance. Villages far away seem so near on these days. There are other days on which we can hear things that are far away very clear, as if they were near. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

A cherry blossom, on a rather exotic cherry tree in the village. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Some things didn’t change. 1957 was yesterday. There were four prize badges like this on the door of the box of a horse. No idea where this horse show took place. I don’t think the Concours Hippique de Valmont is still held. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Even on a grey day on a graveyard it’s beautiful. At least in this direction. ­čśë Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Close-up of colza on a field. I really don’t mind grey sky too much. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The dogs love the view over the hills. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

There was loads of rain in May. Sometimes we had a sunny moment, like in this photo. The sun is chasing the clouds over the fields. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

That’s the awesome view Farbexplosion (cat) has from the window of her room. The sun goes down, time to go and hunt some mice. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

We can’t decide

Rudi, Phex and me took some phots of the sky over Morsan and Berthouville and now we can’t decide which photos are best. It’s the sky’s fault. It’s always so beautiful.

Rudi and Phex are sure, that all photos smell the same. “How could we decide, crazy Frauchen?” Frauchen is the “title” of a female dog owner in German. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

That’s why they prefer to run into the sunset. *sigh* Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

While the sky over the pasturage turns into a blaze… or something. I just read the article about the sunset in Wikipedia. The desription about the reason for the colours is so boring compared to the impression of the colours. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

To make a long explanation short. It looks red, pink and orange at sunset, because those colours have a longer wavelength and the colours with shorter wavelength get filtered. They get filtered because the path of the white beam of the sun through the atmosphere is longer at sunrise and sunset. Sunset on Mars is not very impressive, not to mention the long way to Mars and the lack of air. It’s better to stay here. Not that we planned a trip to Mars…

Stripes and knobs. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The knobs take over. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The stripes don’t give up easily. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Maybe we could call this a stripe made of knobs. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

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We can’t decide by stanzebla is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.

September in Brad’s kingdom

Departing summer hath assumed
An aspect tenderly illumed,
The gentlest look of spring;
That calls from yonder leafy shade
Unfaded, yet prepared to fade,
A timely carolling.
– William Wordsworth, September

Or like John R. Holland says: “Brad is such a good king, he’s promoting cross species love everywhere!”

Schlafm├╝tz lies on the pasturage. She’s quite fat, but she’s elegant nevertheless. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The sky tries to imitate Schlafm├╝tz’ fur. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Miniputz and Phex. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

A rainbow over Villeret. A farmer is driving with his tractor over a field full of seagulls. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Brad and the citizens of Bradland. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Rudi and a fat ewe. She wonders what I’m doing there and I feel like a paparazzo. Would paparazza be correct? Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The sheep take a nap under the chestnut tree. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The lambs on the left belong to the old farmer in Villeret. They are sold by now. I asked if I could buy a ram for breeding, but they were all castrated. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

In the meantime a very nice farmer delivered this straw and our barn is full. Lots of straw for Brad’s people… errr.. sheep. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Dramatic looking clouds over Bradland. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

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Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported by stanzebla is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Some Giverville kitsch

View from the castle gate to the village centre of Giverville. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

The castle has three iron gates. The middle gate originates from the castle of Courb├ępine. The other gates are rather simple. The two simple gates are framed by pillars, that carry finials of (for me) undentifiable shape.

The gate from the castle of Courb├ępine has no pillars. Own photo on Wikimedia Commons, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

A finial on one of the pillars. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Next to the castle are two more properties and then the town ends. At the main road stands a Jesus statue across from the road to La Favril. The statue itself is not very impressive and rather kitschy, but at least surrounded by fields.

Kitschy Jesus. Own photo, licence: licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

Further Read

Giverville on the official website of the federation of municipalities of the canton of Thiberville (French)

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Some Giverville kitsch by stanze is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.