Fog

Most of November was looking like this:

The Fog

or like this:

misty landscape

We had some minutes of sun in between two banks of grey clouds though. I liked this a lot:

Spider silk in the sun

Spider silk glistening in the sun. never seen that much spider silk before. Busy spiders. Saw this on a walk with the dogs up the hill in front of the property.

Rudi (terrier) got a new grey sweater for Christmas. He’s already wearing it and scares the sheep. Sheep are confused by and afraid of new colours. They don’t change their colour and expect everybody else to be like them.

The sheep wonder about Rudi's new sweater

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Feeding season has begun

Winter has arrived in Normandy. We already had two nights with only 2 chilly °C (35.6 °F). The sheep are complaining about the lack of fruits.
Mäh

-“Where have all the chestnuts gone? Long time passing.” -“Fat sheep ate them every one. When will they ever be full?”

And then they walk into the sunset.

Pinke Schafe

I filled the tube feeder for the birds with sunflower seeds and hung up fat balls. The weather is rather bad, grey and gloomy, sometimes even raining and thus I can’t take good photographs at the moment.

Feeding season has started

Poecile palustris or Poecile montana (marsh tit or willow tit) and Parus major (great tit).

At the bird restaurant on a dark day

Three Chloris chloris (greenfinch).

I bought 5 steres of wood and feed the wood stove. The house has no insulation and no other means of heating.

Careful, Bach

Warning
This sheep warns Bach, the Bernese Mountain Dog. Sheep stomp their feet to tell the rest of the world to leave them alone. If a sheep looks at you and stomps its feet, it will jump with its head into your belly.

Bach knows the sheep well and he didn’t come near this one.

Sheep in the shadows

These sheep pretend to be harmless. They look as if they couldn’t hurt a fly.

Photographs are my own, stored on Flickr.

Heritage Day 2013, Second part: On the ropes of Chamblac and crooked photos in Giverville

Deutsche Version: hier.

And I promise, soon there will be animals again.

In Chamblac the church Notre-Dame was open and a member of the city council showed us around. He was very nice and he even allowed me to ring the church bell.. a bit. The ringing mechanism is not electrical, a rarity in the area. It was the first time I ever rang a church bell. It was impressive. Takes ages to swing the bell enough to make it ring and it feels as if it would fall on ones head.

Alain and Jeannine go into the church Notre-Dame of Chamblac. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

The bell ropes. Own photo, licence: CC by-SA Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

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The animals of my new neighbours

Deutsche Version hier.

I got new neighbours. And they have lots of cute animals. Their animals move too much and too fast for my camera, especially if I’m too stupid to use the sport-scenery-preset.

They got a goat and her little daughter. The goat is complaining the whole time, if a human is around. It wants food. Clever goat. There’s no way to stop it. She climbs on people to reach the food.

The goat of my neighbours. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

They got three horses. A miniature horse of the size of a dog, The Irish cob Aquarelle and Quitty, a paint horse. All the horses are very friendly. Quitty likes to eat. Good that she and the goat don’t get the same food.

Quitty. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Like I already said in Moon over the pasturage, they got a cat that got hit by a car in the first week after they moved here. They got four cats. Two hairless cats, one is a Sphynx. And I got to admit, I’ve learned something. I always thought it’s terrible to have hairless cats. But their cats were so cute and nice to me. Sitting on my shoulder and purring in my ear. That really changed my mind. I still wouldn’t want to have a hairless cat, but it’s really not the fault of the cats. They are just as cute as cats with hair. Took no photographs inside the house and can’t show those hairless cats.

The poor cat, that has lost its tail. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Apart of chickens, horses, goats, cats, and a rabbit, they got sheep. The sheep are rather new members of the “zoo”. I will get the cute ram in November and he is supposed to get in close contact with my ladies. For Christmas my neighbours want to eat him.

Wtf? They want to eat me for Christmas? Are they crazy or what? Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

“We’re so small, cute and harmless.” Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

“Hey little girl, do you like to dance with me?” Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Guardians of the property are three dogs of very different size. A Leonberger by name of Vulcain, some kind of spaniel called Forever and a Beauceron puppy by name of Isak. I don’t have any photos of Isak yet. He’s very cute, gives kisses and eats hairs.

Vulcain the Leonberger, he’s ten years old and a really lovely dog. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Vulcain and the little Forever play with each others. They are very good friends. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

Moon over the pasturage

Deutsche Version hier.

“Pasturage” is a terribly difficult word. And it took me ages to learn how to pronounce it. I had to listen to a soundfile, else I’d still say it wrong. Every time I said it wrong, female boss was looking at me strangely. But she never said anything. She probably thought I’m an idiot. Ah well. I guess we’re all idiots sometimes.

Moon over the pasturage. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

I know I’ve already shown you a lot of sunsets. And I really take less sunset photos. But maybe that’s because sunset is very late in summer, and it starts to happen much earlier now. Possible that the sunset season starts in autumn and ends in spring.

Sunset over Villeret. Another violet evening. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

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Visiting Évreux

Deutsche Version ist hier.

I didn’t go to Évreux for fun. I wanted to get a vehicle registration certificate. I didn’t get anything except a lot of photos. But that’s something. Évreux is the capital of the département Eure. It had 50,537 inhabitants in 2010 and it has one of the worst official websites I have ever seen (They want to sell me something?). It has lots of history, even more than the average village around here. And you might have noticed, all those villages got some history.

Court house of Évreux. It was built between 1682 and 1714, renovated and redecorated in the 19th century and hit by lightning in 1911. All the archives burned. Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

In Celtic times (since around 600 BC or earlier) Évreux was the capital of the Eburovices. Then the Romans took over (52 BC to 486 AD). They left some ruins and nice things to put in museums.

Then the Christians took over. In the 5th century the first bishop arrived. His name was Taurinus. His life is a legend. According to said legend he died in the year 410. Maybe he didn’t exist. But the people of Évreux prefer to believe that he evangelised the region, was directly ordered to do so by an angel and so on. The usual story.

In the 10th century Richard I, Duke of Normandy (933–996) found an abbey in the name of Taurinus. The church of that abbey is still standing and I visited it. Hurray. It was built at the end of the 11th century or 12th century or in the 13th century. Wikipedia, the city of Évreux or the tourist office and the government in terms of the “Base Mérimée” don’t seem to be able to agree on a certain date.

Floor plan of the church Saint-Taurin with letters indicating the age of parts of the church. I found the floor plan somewhere, think it should be in the public domain, but am unsure. But I don't claim any rights on this image.

Floor plan of the church Saint-Taurin with letters indicating the age of parts of the church. I found the floor plan somewhere, think it should be in the public domain, but am unsure. But I don’t claim any rights on this image.

église Saint-Taurin à Évreux

It has some nice gargoyles, sadly the relief over the entrance door was damaged in the French Revolution (1789-1799). Own photo on Flickr, licence: CC by-SA/ Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

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